Articles of Hope

I’ll be periodically updating these links with articles I believe speak of hope, community building, models of nurturing, inclusiveness and interaction. Articles I list will be ones that impart wisdom, not information; advocate activism, not paralysis; sustainability and adaptation, not consumerism and fear; coping skills, not desperation; interdependency not isolation. Read them if you are feeling down. Please share with others those you find inspirational.–KM

Megan Quinn, The Renewed Activist. Published July 31, 2006. Megan writes:
“I no longer want to “change the world” but instead nurture the new world being born. I want to create instead of fight. Most importantly, I want to do my work with joy and satisfaction.”

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Carolyn Baker, Ph.D. Post-Petroleum Woman, posted May 16th, 2006 Carolyn writes:
“Families may become families again instead of roommates occupying the same boarding house. As the severity of collapse intensifies, individuals, families, and friends will be forced to reflect on values—what really matters right now, what will get them through a single day, what is ultimately most important in a world where everything, and I mean everything, is radically altered.”

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Shepherd Bliss, PhD., Gender, Peak Oil, and Culture: Part One. Published June 1, 2006 Shepherd writes:

“Have you noticed that so far all the major books on Peak Oil are by men? …More women and people of color could bring various perspectives on Peak Oil-related issues. We need more than persuasive facts, figures, logic, equations, projections and economic, mathematical and geological studies….What might women and people of different races, colors, nationalities, cultures, and ethnicities have to contribute to the growing awareness of Peak Oil and its potential consequences?…Would they tend to raise issues of family (called ohana in Hawaii) and relationships more? Would they be more concerned not just with clear thinking but with how people feel when they hear about oil descent? Would they tend to be less competitive and more cooperative?”

Shepherd Bliss, PhD., Gender, Peak Oil, and Culture: Part Two. Published June 6th, 2006 Shepherd writes:

“[these teachers] go far beyond merely providing information. They offer learning environments that are charged with feelings and connection and seek to evoke wisdom from participants. In their teaching and community work both employ indigenous and female forms of teaching and organizing that are nurturing, inclusive, and interactive.”


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Shepherd Bliss, PhD.,Gender, Peak Oil, and Culture: Part Three- Working Together. Published June 22th, 2006 Shepherd writes quoting one of his letters:

“When I considered going into public speaking on this topic I wondered if I were even ‘allowed’ to play in this ball field, since I wasn’t a scientist, or an author or someone with a long list of accomplishments. I’m just a mom, who worries about the children. I know why more women don’t speak out; they don’t feel legitimate. But I say to heck with it, stand up and speak!”

Shepherd Bliss Beyond Fear Published on 12 Aug 2005 by Energy Bulletin. Archived on 12 Aug 2005.

“When fear emerges, it can either linger or evolve into other more positive feelings, such as acceptance. Fear-based actions are seldom effective. Denial is often followed by anger and/or fear. This is understandable. Peak Oil is an unprecedented event in human history. But getting stuck in fear or anger and merely blaming or working individually only to protect what one has accumulated — rather than working through one’s feelings and with others — can be dangerous. ”


Jan writes: “Here’s two articles from Community Magazine’s issue on Peak Oil. Earth-based intentional communities hold promise of providing a way of life beyond oil.”

Jan Steinman Community Survival during the Coming Energy Decline Jan writes:
“Well, we’ve got off-grid power from solar panels and wind power,” a community might say, “and we’ve got wood stoves, too. No matter how high the price of gas goes, we’ll be fine.”

Perhaps, but does the community buy any food items they don’t grow themselves? While its members can certainly bicycle, car-pool, or use biodiesel to get to the local food co-op, are any of these food items grown, processed, or packaged in other regions? If so, they’ll pay for the ever-increasing cost of transporting these items into their area.”

An Energy Primer

Jan’s exceptionally clear explanation of energy forms.

Ecological Collapse, Trauma Theory and Permaculture Lisa Rayner

Have you ever wished you wrote a really great article in your field, only to find out someone outside your field wrote it, doing a remarkable job? Thank you Lisa Rayner, from all of the Shrinks at PeakOilBlues…

“I have a very visceral understanding of overshoot and collapse. That is because I have experienced overshoot and collapse within my own body. I am a trauma survivor. This experience has given me the ability to understand our civilizational predicament in a way that people who have never experienced severe psychological trauma do not posses to the same degree.”

The Spiritual Challenges of Global Climate Change and Peak Oil by Molly Young Brown: “One response I find right now is to appreciate what I now have, while I have it. Many of us live in considerable abundance and comfort. Rather than living in fear of losing it, I want to enjoy it fully now, perhaps even more keenly knowing it may not last. Rilke asks God, “Just give me a little more time!/ I want to love the things/as no one has thought to love them/until they’re real and ripe and worthy of you” (Rilke’s Book of Hours, Macy/Barrows translation).”

http://www.austinchronicle.com/gyrobase/Issue/story?oid=oid%3A244719

Welcome to the Real World: Rhizome Collective brings activist ideals down to earth

Austin Chronical.com BY RACHEL PROCTOR MAY excerpt:
On the one hand, the scene represents exactly what gives suburban mothers nightmares when their young’uns start talking about a “collective”…..On the other hand, it’s a picture of discipline, industry, and resourcefulness to make John Calvin proud….These successes demonstrate the collective is not just a happy hydra of benevolent idealism. Rather, it’s a surprisingly effective model for connecting people with dreams to the resources they need – whether those are grant dollars or bike parts, volunteers or earthworms, or just a cool space to build puppets for your anarchist theatre troupe.

Navigating the Collapse of Civilization: a Spiritual Map
by Carolyn Baker, Ph.D

…collapse may bring meaning and purpose to our lives which might otherwise have eluded us. In our linear, progress-based existence, we rarely contemplate words like “purpose.” With civilization’s collapse, we may be forced to evaluate daily, perhaps moment to moment, why we are here, if we want to remain here, if life is worth living, if there is something greater than ourselves for which we are willing to remain alive and to which we choose to contribute energy. These decisions probably will not be made in the cozy comfort of our homes, but in the streets, the fields, the deserts, the forests, and beside forgotten rivers and trails. Purpose will rapidly cease being about what we can accomplish and will increasingly become more about who we are. In a collapsing world, the so-called “purpose-driven life” will no longer exist. Humans will be “driven” by only one issue: the determination to survive and assist loved ones in surviving. From that quest for survival will emerge authentic purpose, which will undoubtedly not resemble anything we can imagine today.

Here are some of my favorite posts:

September 7, 2006 Talking Points: Energy Inflation.

September 5, 2006 Embracing Diversity in the Peak Oil Community.

August 21, 2006 Remember, Remember the 5th of September.

August 15, 2006 Where to Learn about Peak Oil.

July 20, 2006 Politics of Peak Oil and Everyday Life.

July 18, 2006 Supporting a farm boy.

July 4, 2006 What would be your action plan if you knew you only had 30 more days to work at your current job and you aren’t sure if you will be able to collect any unemployment?

June 30, 2006 Where to Start?

Life Stages & Peak Oil Issues

Great Grandparents Test – Wondering what kind of story you could leave your descendants? Read this…

Links to Outside Articles of Interest